How to Stop Dachshund Puppy Biting

Published: 01st September 2010
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Dachshund Puppy Biting

Dachshunds were bred to look for vermin. They needed to be able to work unaccompanied, be courageous and sharp in order to chase down and grab hold of their prey. Today we can still notice these traits in Dachshunds who bark at other dogs or people, or who become aggressive. They can quickly become problematic if Dachshunds are not well trained as puppies. The first time you set eyes on any kind of dominance or aggression in your Dachshund puppy, in particular biting, must act.

Many owners will laugh at their Dachshund puppy biting them, thinking it is amusing or delightful. What they don't grasp is that these little nips are shows of dominance that may advance to overt aggression later in life. Each year millions of dogs end up in shelters, may euthanized because of behavior issues that had not been addressed at an early age.

Begin at a Young Age

Once you are looking for a Dachshund puppy ask the breeder to show you a litter. Watch the puppies playing and experimenting with behaviors and see how they learn through feedback from their litter mates. With puppy biting watch how if one puppy nips another, the one who was nipped will most likely bite back. This tells the first puppy that biting is not welcome and, after a few repetitions, the behavior stops and the puppy understands not to bite.

Puppies will test the waters again when you bring them home. You have to be consistent and not allow them to start biting again. The first time you glimpse your Dachshund puppy biting you have to take action and institute training. In young puppies the biting you glimpse is still play biting, testing out behaviors to glimpse which are tolerable and which are not. Never slap any Dachshund, in particular not a young puppy. They are still in their socialization and learning stage and can not appreciate what has happened. Dachshunds upset at an early age are more prone to develop issues with aggression when they age.

The best technique to stop Dachshund puppy biting is to provide understandable, straightforward guidance and be consistent. Use positive training techniques. Reward progress and behaviors you would like, and be certain that everyone involved with your Dachshund is on the same page and not giving mixed messages. Adapt your interactions with your Dachshund so you are not unconsciously reinforcing bad behavior. For example, with Dachshund puppy biting do not play tug of war or wrestle with them. Dachshunds were designed to be hunters and will likely observe a rope toy as prey. Don't be surprised to hear them growling and view them biting at the toy, and you, if you play tug!

Stopping a Dachshund Puppy from Biting

When your Dachshund puppy nips you is your first thought to smack them? If so, think again, this is not the right action to take. What you do have to do is show them that nipping is not okay in a positive manner. Say "No" in a firm tone of voice, or make a loud yelp (this is an effective way to stop biting as it mimics the sound that another puppy would make when bitten). Present them one of their own toys to play with, praising them when they start to chew it.

Once you are consistent using this process you will see your Dachshund puppy soon learns that biting you is not okay, but chewing their toys is. This approach will work with Dachshunds of all ages, although it may be harder on adults who have not been trained or taught to not bite.

If your Dachshund is more aggressive than just giving the occasional nip or gentle bite you need to go to puppy or dog training classes or get the advice of a veterinary behaviorist. A training class will give you professional assistance in stopping your Dachshund puppy biting and will also give an opportunity for socialization with other dogs and people, something that is very important for Dachshunds. Being a responsible Dachshund owner includes training well and addressing issues including Dachshund puppy biting. Addressing problems as they surface reduces their seriousness and also helps encourage the association you have with your Dachshund.

For more information on Dachshund training and health visit http://www.dachshundtrainingtips.com



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